• Visual AIDS

    Founded in 1988, Visual AIDS is the only contemporary arts organization fully committed to raising AIDS awareness and creating dialogue around HIV issues today, by producing and presenting visual art projects, exhibitions, public forums and publications - while assisting artists living with HIV/AIDS. We are committed to preserving and honoring the work of artists with HIV/AIDS and the artistic contributions of the AIDS movement. We embrace diversity and difference in our staff, leadership, artists and audiences.


    Visual AIDS uses the power of art as a catalyst to engage public response, dialogue and scholarship around HIV/AIDS through presenting contemporary art exhibitions, artist projects, public events and publications.   We produce  catalogs and printed matter. Year-round we collaborate with teachers and students to facilitate research and special projects.



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  • Heresies #3 "Lesbian Art and Artists" Vol. 1, No. 3 Fall 1977

    Heresies: A Feminist Publication on Art and Politics

    Made available by the Heresies PDF archive.

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  • Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History

    Harmony Hammond

    Rizzoli, 2000, 208 pages, ISBN-10: 0847822486

    The first history of lesbian art in the United States, this volume documents works since 1970 within the context of gay culture and political activism. Authoritative and engaging, this is a "from the trenches" story of which women made what, when, and where. Hammond moves from the mainstream art world to alternative venues, weaving a compelling narrative complete with critical and theoretical discourse. Profiles of 18 prominent lesbian artists, from Kate Millett and Joan Snyder to Deborah Kass and Catherine Opie, complete this groundbreaking contribution to contemporary art history.

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  • LGBTQ Study Group of the American Musicological Society (AMS)

    The LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer) Study Group of the AMS is a loosely-formed subset of AMS members who explore issues of music, sexuality and gender in scholarship. They hold a regular study session at the AMS Annual Meeting and also sponsor the Philip Brett Award.

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  • Art labor, sex politics : feminist effects in 1970s British art and performance

    Siona Wilson

    University of Minnesota Press February 2015, 320 pages, 56 b&w photos, 11 color plates, 6 x 8, ISBN 978-0-8166-8575-2

    In Art Labor, Sex Politics Siona Wilson investigates the charged relationship of sex and labor politics as it played out in the making of feminist art in 1970s Britain. Her sustained exploration of works of experimental film, installation, performance, and photography maps the intersection of feminist and leftist projects in the artistic practices of this heady period.

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  • Queer Caucus of the American Studies Association (ASA)

    The ASA Queer Caucus serves four purposes: 1) to work for inclusion of issues of interest to gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender faculty, independent scholars, and graduate students at the ASA annual meeting; 2) to serve as a networking group for scholars interested in queer studies; 3) to offer mentorship to gay/lesbian/transgendered graduate students, independent scholars, and faculty as they pursue their work; 4) to keep the ASA appraised of issues (institutional, academic, national and international) affecting the queer members of its constituency. The primary purpose of an ASA caucus is to offer networking opportunities for its participants. The Queer Caucus is currently looking for new leadership. In order to revive the Queer Caucus, the new leaders should reaffirm or revise, and submit a caucus description, including their rationale and purpose, an agenda with their plans and goals, and contact information.

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  • Committee on LGBT History of the American Historical Association (AHA)

    Welcome to the homepage of the Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History, an affiliated society of the American Historical Association. The Committee on Lesbian and Gay History was founded in 1979 to promote the study of homosexuality in the past and present by facilitating communication among scholars in a variety of disciplines working on a variety of cultures. The name of the committee was changed to Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in January 2009. Since 1982, the Committee has been officially recognized as an affiliate of the American Historical Association and meets annually in conjunction with the AHA conference, where we sponsor sessions on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer history. One need not be a member of the AHA to join the Committee.

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  • Queer Caucus of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies (SCMS)

    The Queer Caucus of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies was formed in 1991 to promote and support the study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer history, theory, and criticism in relation to screen and media cultures. Through our activities, such as sponsoring panels and workshops, hosting events and screenings, and organizing a Queer Mentorship program, the Caucus aims to foster the creation of a community of scholars and producers of queer media.

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  • Association for Queer Anthropology (AQA)

    The Association for Queer Anthropology (AQA), formerly known as the Society of Lesbian and Gay Anthropologists (SOLGA), is a section of the American Anthropological Association and was founded in 1988. AQA serves the interests of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and other queer and allied anthropologists in the American Anthropological Association. AQA promotes anthropological research and education on homosexuality, bisexuality, transgender/transsexuality, and other sexual and gender identities and expressions, and their intersections with race, class, disability, nationality, colonialism and globalization. AQA supports and encourages a diverse membership within the AAA and actively seeks to increase that diversity along lines of race, class, disability, nationality, gender, sexuality, and other forms of social difference.

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  • ACRE (Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions)

    ACRE (Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions) is an artist-run non-profit based in Chicago devoted to employing various systems of support for emerging artists and to creating a generative community of cultural producers. ACRE investigates and institutes models designed to help artists develop, present, and discuss their practices by providing forums for idea exchange, interdisciplinary collaboration, and experimental projects.

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  • Bachelors of a different sort: queer aesthetics, material culture and the modern interior in Britain

    John Potvin

    Manchester University Press, May 2014, 336 pp., illustrations, ISBN 9780719084997

    The bachelor has long held an ambivalent, uncomfortable and even at times unfriendly position in society. This book carefully considers the complicated relationships between the modern queer bachelor and interior design, material culture and aesthetics in Britain between 1885 and 1957. The seven deadly sins of the modern bachelor (queerness, idolatry, askesis, decadence, decoration, glamour and artifice) comprise a contested site and reveal in their respective ways the distinctly queer twinning of shame and resistance. It pays close attention to the interiors of Lord Ronald Gower, Alfred Taylor, Oscar Wilde, Charles Shannon and Charles Ricketts, Edward Perry Warren and John Marshall, Sir Cedric Morris and Arthur Lett-Haines, Noël Coward and Cecil Beaton. Richly illustrated and written in a lively and accessible manner, Bachelors of a different sort is at once theoretically ambitious and rich in its use of archival and various historical sources.

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  • Intergenerational LGBT Artist Residency, Toronto

    The INTERGENERATIONAL LGBT ARTIST RESIDENCY launched in August 2013. The vision for the residency is intergenerational, direct engagement with Canadian LGBT art and political histories.

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  • AIRspace, San Francisco

    The oldest, longest running residency program for queer performance in the United States, AIRspace was founded in 1986 by the former Jon Sims Center for the Performing Arts (JSC) in San Francisco. When the JSC closed in 2007, SAFEhouse for the Performing Arts began curating the program, serving approximately twenty artists per year.

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  • Pop Out: Queer Warhol

    Editors Jennifer Doyle, Jonathan Flatley, José Esteban Muñoz

    Duke University Press, 1996, 280 pp., 53 illustrations, ISBN: 978-0-8223-1741-8

    Andy Warhol was queer in more ways than one. A fabulous queen, a fan of prurience and pornography, a great admirer of the male body, he was well known as such to the gay audiences who enjoyed his films, the police who censored them, the gallery owners who refused to show his male nudes, and the artists who shied from his swishiness, not to mention all the characters who populated the Factory. Yet even though Warhol became the star of postmodernism, avant-garde, and pop culture, this collection of essays is the first to explore, analyze, appreciate, and celebrate the role of Warhol’s queerness in the making and reception of his film and art. Ranging widely in approach and discipline, Pop Out demonstrates that to ignore Warhol’s queerness is to miss what is most valuable, interesting, sexy, and political about his life and work...

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  • GLQ: Art Works: Parts 1 +2

    Editors David Román, Richard Meyer

    QLQ, Volume: 12, Issue: 2 + 3, 2006

    Art Works, Parts 1 and 2 address how art, theater, performance, film, and visual culture have reshaped the established terms of gender and sexuality and contributed to fashioning a queer world. Bringing together work from both the visual and the performing arts, each collection showcases cutting-edge research on a wide range of queer artists, media, and sexual subcultures. The contributors to these issues—scholars in art history, visual culture, theater and performance studies, and film and media studies—approach art not as a reflection of history but as a creative response to it, a response that imagines alternative forms of social, sexual, and creative life...

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  • Artist Statement: Visible Monstrosity as Empowerment

    Anthony Clair Wagner

    TSQ, 2015, Volume 2, Number 2: 341-344

    “Visible Monstrosity as Empowerment” asks, How can we own the transgender imaginary? Anthony Clair Wagner uses the figure of the monster in their art to reflect the stigmatization of monsterized others, specifically transsexuals. Wagner proposes that refusing hegemonic shame and boundaries through embracing the stigmatizing figure of the monster helps deconstruct the violent hegemonic imaginary. They call for monstrous visibility. In this artist statement Wagner explains the importance of the appropriation of the figure of the monster in their art as a tool for empowerment.

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  • GI's Anatomy: Drawing Sex, Drawing Gender, Drawing Bodies

    Anna McNay, Jay Stewart

    TSQ, 2015, Volume 2, Number 2: 330-335

    Historically, the dominant body of representations of gender variance has been presented from the point of view of the medical practitioner: as abnormalities, as “other.” In spring 2013, thirty transgender and intersex people participated in GI's Anatomy, a series of practical life-drawing workshops in London programmed by the arts-based organization Gendered Intelligence (GI). The models posing also identified as transgender or as having an intersex condition. The project gave its participants the opportunity to create a significant body of work, to issue new representations of their own bodies, to take a more holistic view of the person and the wider social and cultural references in which they sit. This article reviews the goals and achievements of this seminal project, taking a closer look at the experience of two participants and focusing on the circularity of knowledge production at play.

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  • “Sitting. With a Candle? Up My Ass!”: A Portrait of Harmodius in Exile

    Dominic Johnson

    TSQ, 2015, Volume 2, Number 4: 695-700

    “Sitting. With a Candle? Up My Ass!” explores the archive of the Bay Area photographer David Greene, focusing firstly on Shameless (1974), a series of portraits of transgender people, queers, and people in drag, often posed candidly in domestic and other domestic settings. It zooms into Greene's work to draw out the story of the forgotten genderfuck poet and activist Harmodius in Exile—Greene's lover and peer—posing archival research as an access point to concealed or “minor” histories of lesbian, gay, and transgender life in San Francisco in the 1970s. In my analysis, Harmodius's strategic maximalism—captured so evocatively in Greene's portraits and evoked in Harmodius's own poetry (cited in the title)—is both a political tool and a technique of whimsy, a gesture of serious play that stages the poet's commitment to aesthetic, political, and corporeal self-fashioning.

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  • Radical Living Archives and Trans* Embodiment: Shu Lea Cheang's Brandon

    Abbra Kotlarczyk

    TSQ, 2015, Volume 2, Number 4: 683-688

    Multimedia artist Shu Lea Cheang's Brandon was supported by the Guggenheim Museum New York in 1995 as a multiauthor/multi-institutional collaboration. Created in response to the news of the Nebraska murder of transgender youth Brandon Teena in 1993, the project exists as a feminist hypertext and as such can be regarded as a living archive of transgender embodiment. Due to the work's current offline status, questions arise as to how it might be factored beyond its material presence, as a temporal placeholder for radical and affective archiving. Major sociocultural factors such as the introduction of the information super highway at the time of the project's creation allow for a topographical look at how digital codes and online interfacing factor as potential forms of emancipation regarding transgender embodiment and performativity.

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  • In Herzog's Hands: Transtextuality (Senate Bill 48)

    Jessica Lee Mathiason

    TSQ, 2015, Volume 2, Number 4: 679-682

    In her critical review of Katie Herzog's art installation Transtextuality (Senate Bill 48), Jessica Lee Mathiason argues that the artist's collection of forty-eight portraits transforms the archive into an artwork while questioning institutional boundaries and disrupting its previous stability, position, and purpose. A reimagining of Gerhard Richter's 1972 installation of 48 Portraits of men of letters, Herzog's piece sets itself apart from the original through its commitment to materiality. While Richter removed all brushstrokes from his portraits, making them closely resemble the encyclopedia photographs he used as models, Herzog instead embraces the hand with her long, sweeping, and visible strokes. Using her unmistakable indentations, daring lines, and stylized portraiture to foreground the contractedness of art and the archive, Herzog challenges Richter's methodology and disciplinary modes of historiography, which have systematically excluded LGBT persons from our encyclopedias, textbooks, and collective memory.

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  • Trans Intelligentsia A Western Pictorial?

    Zowie Davy

    TSQ, 2015, Volume 2, Number 4: 676-678.

    Katie Herzog's Transtextuality (Senate Bill 48), an installation “depicting 48 portraits of transgender men and women of letters,” took on the mammoth task of displaying portraits of trans pioneers who represent transgender intelligentsia. The celebration of her Western “sitters” is an impressive display, and their academic work has no doubt contributed vast and wide-reaching insights into mine and the lives of some of my trans sisters, brothers, and others. However, her wall of fame, while potentially innocent in its creation, neglects the class, ethnicity/race, sexuality, and other situational aspects of trans writers' lives that may have impacted the performative aspects of knowledge production about (trans) gender beyond the Western imaginary. Although this trans celebration may feel subversive because it challenges the status quo of those whose knowledge counts vis-à-vis cisgender people, we must be constantly drawn to ask, does the subversion suppress others?

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  • Queer Beauty: Sexuality and Aesthetics from Winckelmann to Freud and Beyond

    Whitney Davis

    Columbia University Press, Columbia Themes in Philosophy, Social Criticism, and the Arts, August 2010, 368 pages, ISBN-10: 0231146906

    The pioneering work of Johann Winckelmann (1717-1768) identified a homoerotic appreciation of male beauty in classical Greek sculpture, a fascination that had endured in Western art since the Greeks. Yet after Winckelmann, the value (even the possibility) of art's queer beauty was often denied. Several theorists, notably the philosopher Immanuel Kant, broke sexual attraction and aesthetic appreciation into separate or dueling domains. In turn, sexual desire and aesthetic pleasure had to be profoundly rethought by later writers...

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  • Pictures and Passions: A History of Homosexuality in the Visual Arts

    James M. Saslow

    Viking Adult, 1999, 416 pages, ISBN 10: 0670859532

    This text presents an overview of gay art from the beginning of recorded time to the present: works about gay themes by identifiably gay artists or for gay patrons. Saslow carefully examines the classical world, in which homoerotic love was recorded, celebrated, and satirized in the visual arts, and he examines the ways in which the guilt-free acceptance and institutionalized dignity the Greeks accorded to homosexuality have persisted as a nostalgic symbol of lost arcadian ideals in nearly every later civilization.

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  • Scott Burton: Collected Writings on Art and Performance, 1965-1975

    Edited by David Getsy

    Soberscove Press, October 2012, 5.5 x 8"paperback, black & white with 10-page color insert, 258 pages, 978-0-9824090-4-6

    Before gaining widespread recognition for sculptural work that sought to dissolve aesthetic boundaries, most notably between sculpture and furniture, Scott Burton produced a substantial body of art writing in the late 1960s and early 1970s. An eclectic and wide-ranging critic, he wrote such important texts as the introduction to the groundbreaking exhibition “Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form” and served as an editor for both ARTnews and Art in America. In these same years, Burton became known as a performance artist, developing themes he pursued in his writing. Yet, his role as an artist-critic has rarely been discussed.

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  • Art and Homosexuality: A History of Ideas

    Christopher Reed

    Oxford University Press, 2011, 304 Pages, 178 b/w & color illus., 7 x 10 inches, ISBN: 9780195399073

    Offers a wide-ranging treatment of art and homosexuality while narrating the fascinating story of their symbiotic evolutionFeatures over 175 illustrations that vividly depict this relationship. Spans from ancient to contemporary cultures and includes examples from around the globe. Considers an array of art forms: paintings, sculptures, photography, writing, and more.

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  • Art and Queer Culture

    Edited by Catherine Lord and Richard Meyer

    Phaidon Press2013424 pp.290 illustrationsISBN: 9780714849355

    Attempts to trouble the conventions of gender and sexuality, to highlight the performative aspects of identity and to oppose the tyranny of the normal are all woven into the historical fabric of homosexuality and its representation. From Oscar Wilde to Ryan Trecartin, from the molly houses of eighteenth-century London to the Harlem drag balls of the 1920s, the flamboyant refusal of social and sexual norms has fuelled the creation of queer art and life throughout the modern period.

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  • Art AIDS America

    Jonathan Katz, Rock Hushka

    University of Washington Press and Tacoma Art Museum, December 2015, 288 pp., 200 color illus., 8.25 x 10.5 in.

    Art AIDS America is the first comprehensive overview and reconsideration of 30 years of art made in response to the AIDS epidemic in the United States. This book foregrounds the role of HIV/AIDS in shifting the development of American art away from the cool conceptual foundations of postmodernism and toward a new, more insistently political and autobiographical voice. Art AIDS Americasurveys more than 100 works of American art from the early 1980s to the present, reintroducing and exploring the whole spectrum of artistic responses to HIV/AIDS, from in-your-face activism to quiet elegy.

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  • Hide / Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture

    Jonathan D. Katz, David C. Ward

    Smithsonian Books, November 2, 2010, 296 pp., ISBN-10: 1588342999

    Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture, companion volume to an exhibition of the same name at the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, traces the defining presence of same-sex desire in American portraiture through a seductive selection of more than 140 full-color illustrations, drawings, and portraits from leading American artists. Arcing from the turn of the twentieth century, through the emergence of the modern gay liberation movement in 1969, the tragedies of the AIDS epidemic, and to the present, Hide/Seekopenly considers what has long been suppressed or tacitly ignored, even by the most progressive sectors of our society: the influence of gay and lesbian artists in creating American modernism...

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  • MOTHA Museum of Transgender Hirstory & Art

    MOTHA is dedicated to moving the hirstory and art of transgender people to the center of public life. The preeminent institution of its kind, the museum insists on an expansive and unstable definition of transgender, one that is able to encompass all trans and gender non-conformed art and artists.

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  • Lesbian Decadence: Representations in Art and Literature of Fin-de-Siècle France

    Nicole G. Albert

    Harrington Park Press, LLC12/8/2015Translated by Nancy Erber andWilliam Peniston380 pages25 b&w illustrations and 14 color illustrationsCloth, $85.00 ISBN: 9781939594075

    In 1857 the French poet Charles Baudelaire, who was fascinated by lesbianism, created a scandal with Les Fleurs du Mal [The Flowers of Evil]. This collection was originally entitled “The Lesbians” and described women as “femmes damnées,” with “disordered souls” suffering in a hypocritical world. Then twenty years later, lesbians in Paris dared to flaunt themselves in that extraordinarily creative period at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries which became known as the Belle Époque...

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  • Queer Cultural Center, San Francisco

    Founded in 1993, Qcc is a multiracial community-building organization that fosters the artistic, economic and cultural development of San Francisco's LGBT community. We implement our mission by operating programs that commission and present Queer artists, that promote the development of culturally diverse Queer arts organizations and that document significant Queer arts events taking place in San Francisco.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Queer Pier: 40 Years

    Thomas J. Lax, Jeannine Tang, A. Naomi Jackson, Parallel Lines, Ginger Brooks Takahashi & Marvin J. Taylor

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    Queer Her: 40Years, an arts-based initiative that took place in 2009 and 2010, explored the intersection of archiving, cultural history, and public space in community-making and social change. The project was timed to coincide with the tenth anniversary of FIERCE, a membership-based organization building the leadership and power of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth of color in New York City.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Kathy Acker's Clothes

    Kaucyila Brooke

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    The avant-garde writer Kathy Acker died in November 1997. During the summer of 1999,1 made a photographic study of her clothes. The archive of 154 photographs does not represent the complete wardrobe of Acker's T-shirts, shoes, lingerie, and stockings, but a selection I made with the assistance of the writer Matias Viegener, a close personal friend of Acker's and the executor of her estate.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Bring Your Own Body: The Story of Lynn Harris

    Zackary Drucker

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    The archive of the intersex pioneer Lynn Edward Harris at the ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives, University of Southern California, includes thousands of photographs, manuscripts, journals and self-reflections, newspaper articles, and audio and video tapes, in addition to a lock of human hair, a graduation cap, a “Miss Costa Mesa” beauty queen sash, a silver engraved baby cup, and other assorted artifacts.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Some Faggy Gestures

    Henrik Olesen

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    This seven-panel installation was first displayed in the exhibition Some Gay-Lesbian Artists and/or Artists Relevant to Homo-Social Culture Born between c. 1500–1870, at the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich, in 2007. Texts and images, set off against a black background, are compiled under headings that structure the viewing/reading experience.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Imaginary Archives: A Dialogue

    Julia Bryan-Wilson & Cheryl Dunye

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    As there are many kinds of queer histories, so too are there many types of queer archives: band ones, tender ones, bureaucratic ones. But perhaps the queerest things about archives are their silences— their telling blanks and perversely willful holes. The filmmaker Cheryl Dunye has consistently explored the affective potency that lies within historical records—and the gaps in those records—to explore how fictional archives might be necessary for queer fives in the present as well as for imagined futures.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Analogue

    Zoe Leonard

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Sharing an Archive of Feelings: A Conversation

    Tammy Rae Carland & Ann Cvetkovich

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    Tammy Rae Carland: As I remember, we met in 1995 in Portland, Oregon, through our musician girlfriends. I had just finished graduate school and had gone to New York, to the Whitney Independent Study Program, and I was about to be deployed, which is the way I think about it, to my first teaching job in the middle of Indiana.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Putting the Invent in Inventory: Ulrike Müller in Conversation with Corrine Fitzpatrick

    Ulrike Müller & Corrine Fitzpatrick

    There was a time when you were not a slave, remember that. You walked alone, full of laughter, you bathed bare-bellied. You say you have lost all recollection of it, remember…. You say there are no words to describe this time, you say it dots not exist, but remember, make an effort to remember. Or failing that, invent.

    —Monique Wittig

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Veronica's Ghost: Queer Time and the Porous Archive

    Barbara McBane

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    A while back, E. G. Crichton invited me to contribute to her project Lineage: Matchmaking in the Archive. She selected three archives from the San Francisco LGBT Historical Society's collection and asked me to respond to one. I chose the skimpiest one: a slim box with a few folders. It belonged to someone born in 1945.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Notes on Internment Camp

    Tina Takemoto

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    I have always been skeptical about matchmaking and blind dates. But when the artist E. G. Crichton declared that my “perfect match” was a deceased gay Asian American dandy named Jiro Onuma, I was intrigued. In 2009 Crichton invited me to participate in her ongoing project Lineage: Matchmaking in the Archive, in which she couples contemporary artists with LGBT individuals from the past in hopes of sparking “dyadic” queer bonds between the living and the dead that will result in artistic responses to the archive.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: 62 Books

    Eve Fowler

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    The Sophie Horowitz Story, Sarah Schulman, Naiad Press Inc., 1984. “We all knew Laura Wolfe. She was part of a group known as Women Against Bad Things. The New York Post headline read ANTI-AMERICAN, COMMIE, LEZZIE BLOOD-THIRSTY PIG over a copy of Lauras high school graduation picture. I cleared a place on my desk and tacked her photo to the wall.” We'll Do It Ourselves: Combating Sexism in Education, Barbara Yates, Steve Werner, David Rosen, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, Nebraska, 1974.

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  • Forum: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives: Migrating Archives

    E. G. Crichton

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    Archives most of the time sit on shelves, waiting to be wooed by the occasional researcher. They sit there, fixed in a stasis that is broken only when someone takes them out past the temperature controls, through a locked door— a chance for the archives to spread out and receive some attention.

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  • Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives

    Tirza True Latimer

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    More than a repository of objects or texts, the archive is the very process of selecting, ordering, and preserving the past—in short, of making history. Artists, scholars, and activists have been rethinking the politics of what archives preserve, demonstrating that the piecing together of cultural memory is not a neutral pursuit.

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  • “Gay Life Artists”: Les Petites Bonbons and Camp Performativity in the 1970s

    Kirsten Olds

    Art JournalVolume 72, Issue 2, 2013

    “WE ARE GAY & WE ARE FREE/X. WE ARE SWEET, SOFT & CREAMY BONBONS. TRY US SOMETIME.” With this enticing invitation, the artists' group Les Petites Bonbons introduced itself in 1972 to members of the international correspondence-art network and to the gay activist scene in the United States in “bon bon mots,” a document circulated by mail to various outlets, among them the art critic and curator Lucy Lippard; John Francis Hunter, the author of a guide to gay goings-on; and the journal Gay Sunshine.

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  • Leather Archives & Museum, Chicago

    This archive and museum is committed to "the compilation, preservation and maintenance of leather lifestyle and related lifestyles [including but not limited to the Gay and Lesbian communities], history, archives and memorabilia for historical, educational and research purposes."

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  • June L. Mazer Lesbian Archives, Los Angeles

    "The June L. Mazer Lesbian Archives remains the only archive on this side of the continent that is dedicated exclusively to preserving lesbian history and to guaranteeing that those who come after us will not have to believe that they “walk alone.” The Archives is committed to gathering and preserving materials by and about lesbians and feminists of all classes, ethnicities, races and experiences. Included are personal letters and scrapbooks, artwork, manuscripts, books, records, newspapers, magazines, photographs, videotapes, flyers, papers of lesbian and feminist organizations, private papers, and even clothing, such as softball uniforms from the 1940s and 50s."

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  • Lesbian Herstory Archives, Brooklyn

    The Lesbian Herstory Archives is home to the world's largest collection of materials by and about lesbians and their communities.

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  • ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives

    ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries is the largest repository of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) materials in the world. Founded in 1952, ONE Archives currently houses over two million archival items including periodicals, books, film, video and audio recordings, photographs, artworks, organizational records, and personal papers. ONE Archives has been a part of the University of Southern California Libraries since 2010.

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  • Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, New York

    The Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art is the first dedicated LGBTQ art museum in the world with a mission to exhibit and preserve LGBTQ art, and foster the artists who create it The Leslie-Lohman Museum embraces the rich creative history of the LGBTQ art community by educating, informing, inspiring, entertaining, and challenging all who enter its doors.

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  • Romaine Brooks: A Life

    Cassandra Langer

    University of Wisconsin PressSeptember 2015168 pp. 29 b/w illus.LC: 2015008825 ND

    The artistic achievements of Romaine Brooks (1874–1970), both as a major expatriate American painter and as a formative innovator in the decorative arts, have long been overshadowed by her fifty-year relationship with writer Natalie Barney and a reputation as a fiercely independent, aloof heiress who associated with fascists in the 1930s. In Romaine Brooks: A Life, art historian Cassandra Langer provides a richer, deeper portrait of Brooks’s aesthetics and experimentation as an artist—and of her entire life, from her chaotic, traumatic childhood to the enigmatic decades after World War II, when she produced very little art...

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  • Warhol & Mapplethorpe: Guise & Dolls

    Patricia Hickson, Jonathan D. Katz, Tirza True Latimer, Vincent Fremont, Eileen Myles, Christopher Makos, Maria Luisa Pacelli

    Yale University Press10/27/2015184 pages148 color illus.ISBN: 9780300214338 Hardcover

    Andy Warhol (1928–1987) and Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–1989) are well known for significant work in portraiture and self-portraiture that challenged gender roles and notions of femininity, masculinity, and androgyny. This exciting and original book is the first to consider the two artists together, examining the powerful portraits they created during the vibrant and tumultuous era bookended by the Stonewall riots and the AIDS crisis...

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  • Abstract Bodies: Sixties Sculpture in the Expanded Field of Gender

    David Getsy

    Yale University Press11/3/2015392 p., 7 1/2 x 10 50 color + 50 b/w illus.ISBN: 9780300196757 Hardcover

    Original and theoretically astute, Abstract Bodies is the first book to apply the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies to the discipline of art history. It recasts debates around abstraction and figuration in 1960s art through a discussion of gender’s mutability and multiplicity. In that decade, sculpture purged representation and figuration but continued to explore the human as an implicit reference. Even as the statue and the figure were left behind, artists and critics asked how the human, and particularly gender and sexuality, related to abstract sculptural objects that refused the human form...

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